Instructors


David Pizarro
Cornell University
dap54@cornell.edu
www.peezer.net

Course TA

Nhi Ngho

  • Northeastern University
  • ngo.ho@husky.neu.edu
  • http://www.northeastern.edu/ledlab/members/nhi/
  • My main interest lies in how perceiver- and target-associated factors influence how contextual cues are integrated in emotion perception. Particularly, I am interested in how the age, race, and culture of the perceiver and the target affects how the perceiver weight physical and social contextual cues in facial emotion perception.

Course Participants

Jens Bender    

  • University of Koblenz · Landau
  • bender@uni-landau.de
  • I'm interested in the influence of moral values and moral identity on behavior. Specifically, I'm interested in situational forces that amplify or attenuate the influence of moral values on behavior and the psychological processes underlying these effects. 

Eric Chen

  • University of California, Irvine
  • chene5@uci.edu
  • I’m interested in how our motivation to think in coherent narratives influences not just subject moral judgments, but also factual beliefs. This is often apparent in controversial events such as police shootings, in which people often have opposite beliefs about who the victim and who the villain was.

Atilla Cidam    

  • University of Connecticut
  • atilla.cidam@uconn.edu
  • I study moral motivation and judgment with a focus on perceptions of moral character across time. My research has examined inspiration by imperfect moral exemplars, shame and guilt as a source of moral motivation, as well as predictors of collective action.

Jonathan Gallegos

  • Pennsylvania State University
  • jmg599@psu.edu
  • My work focuses on gender issues, specifically those that involve acts of prejudice, discrimination, and aggression. I currently explore (1) how stereotypes and threats to masculine identities provide a basis for discrimination against women, and (2) the unexplored domains of the contemporary definition of masculinity (like emotional toughness and morality).

Aurelien Graton

  • University of Bordeaux (France)
  • aurelien.graton@gmail.com
  • My research focuses on guilt and addresses two main topics : 1) understanding under which circumstances (e.g., interaction with insisting or subtle messages) guilt exerts a positive or negative (e.g., backfire effects) influence on persuasive pro-environmental communication 2) finding which cognitive underlying processes are involved (e.g., attention bias toward reparation). 

Sean Hudson

  • University of Colorado, Boulder
  • sean.m.hudson@colorado.edu
  • I'm currently investigating the impact that individuated experience and motivation to individuate has on other-race face recognition and holistic/configural processing. An additional aspect of this work concerns the role that individuated experience has in decreasing racial prejudice and stereotyping via effects on face perception/representation.

Satia Marotta    

  • Tufts University
  • satia.marotta@tufts.edu
  • My research focuses on the intersection of social psychology, law, and public policy. My recent work examines how diversity, and policies that foster diversity, can affect student performance in higher education.

Sean Murphy    

  • University of Queensland
  • seanchrismurphy@gmail.com
  • http://www.seancmurphy.com
  • I'm interested in the follow questions: How we decide when to blame victims for their misfortunes and how strongly this impacts our willingness to offer help, how individuals strategically increase the information value of signals of positive moral traits, and how we think about the moral character of the dead.

Ivuoma Onyeador

  • University of California, Los Angeles
  • ionyeador@psych.ucla.edu
  • https://ucla.academia.edu/IvuomaOnyeador
  • I am interested in how individuals process information about the social world they are embedded in, particularly with reference to race and gender. I have projects examining perceptions of racial hierarchies, media representations, social categorization, and evaluations of targets being selected from a diverse pool of applicants.

Liz Redford

  • University of Florida
  • lizzie.redford@gmail.com
  • http://lizredford.weebly.com/
  • Broadly, I'm interested in basic morality and attitudes research. More specifically, I'm currently interested in how hierarchy maintenance facilitates a view of justice as a hierarchy-based transaction: perceptions that crime threatens hierarchies, motives to restore power and status through punishment, and support for retributive punishment.
  • Other links: https://osf.io/gqmsh/

Amber Sanchez

  • University of California, Davis
  • amsanchez@ucdavis.edu
  • How do people make moral judgments?  How do these moral judgements change? My research examines how psychological distance affects our mental representations an issue (e.g., moral transgressions) and its implication for people's attitudes.  I also examine the lingering and asymmetric effects of positive and negative information on attitudes.

Chelsea Schein

  • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • cschein77@gmail.com
  • Moral judgments change over time.  Plastic bags, disposable diapers, and k-cups were initially considered innovations, but are now morally contentious.  Why are these previously innocuous household items suddenly a matter of moral outrage?  The answer likely involves shifting perceptions of harm.  My research explores the role of harm in moralization.     
  • Other links: http://www.mpmlab.org/The%20Uncensored%20Truth%20about%20Morality.pdf

Paul Stillman    

  • Ohio State University 
  • paul.e.stillman@gmail.com

Hanna Szekeres

  • IDC Herzliya, Israel
  • hanna.szekeres@gmail.com
  • My general research interests are different aspects of intergroup relations, particularly within intractable conflicts (e.g., the Israeli-Palestinian conflict), between minority and majority members (e.g., Roma people in Europe), and stereotypes of women. My thesis focuses on reactions to racism.

Andrea Vial

  • Yale University
  • andrea.vial@yale.edu
  • www.andreavial.com
  • I study how gender stereotypes contribute to the slow advancement of women to positions of power, authority, and prestige. In particular, I am interested in how hierarchy legitimation processes may play out differently for powerful women versus men, making it more difficult for women to thrive in leadership positions.

J. Guillermo Villalobos

  • University of Nevada, Reno
  • villalobosjg@gmail.com
  • My fields of interest are language, persuasion, and decision-making in contexts involving law-enforcement (e.g., interrogations) and social policy.  I am also interested in theories of prejudice, stereotyping, and social justice, particularly when applied to the experiences of stigmatized or disadvantaged populations (e.g., women, ethnic minorities) in the criminal justice system.

Sarah Ward

  • University of Missouri-Columbia
  • sjhtg6@mail.missouri.edu
  • My research investigates how religion influences moral behavior and identity as well as how individual differences in reliance on intuition influence moral judgments.  I also examine how various social-cognitive factors influence meaning in life judgments.    

Hanne Watkins

  • The University of Melbourne
  • hwatkins@student.unimelb.edu.au
  • Why are soldiers permitted to kill other soldiers? Third party observers, who would usually condemn killing, make more lenient moral judgments about the actions of soldiers in war. In my research I use moral psychology to explain how the war context influences moral judgment. 
  • Other links: https://www.academia.edu/12139354/EASP_2014_The_Moral_Character_of_Soldiers_poster_